Primo

March 31 – April 6, 2013

Market Outlook

Lettuce:
The Huron growing area has started and availability has improved, driving the market down quickly. Light weights and small sized lettuce being reported in both Yuma and Huron.
Leaf: 
Romaine market is adjusting down quickly as product availability is improving daily.
Broccoli:
Broccoli market is on the rise as Yuma has finished and Salinas has started in a small way.
Cauliflower:
Cauliflower market is following the Broccoli market and supplies are tightening.
Carrots:
Market has remained steady out of Georgia. Quality has been very good.
Celery:
Celery market has adjusted down as supplies improve in Oxnard.
Strawberries:
The Florida berry season has come to an end, and we are now in full swing on California.
Potatoes:
Idaho market has tightened up as the Norkotah season is wrapping up with still some availability but very limited.
Onions:
Onion market will firm up again going into next week, with some deals still out there on some old storage crop out of Idaho/Oregon.
Citrus:
Market is steady on navels. We’ve seen a slight increase in the lemon market. Quality has been good on lemons and very good to excellent on oranges.
Cucumbers:
The market on cucumbers has seen some relief and has adjusted down slightly.
Peppers:
Market is up today on peppers and will remain higher into next week.
Tomatoes:
Tomato market has come off on rounds a few dollars. Romas and cherries are steady to up slightly. Grapes are stronger.

Feature of the Week

This week Primo is featuring Brussel Sprouts! Part of the brassica (cabbage) family, Brussel Sprouts grow on a tall stemmed plant which reaches about 1 meter in height and has cabbage-like leaves. Although Brussel Sprouts have a somewhat bad reputation these sprouts deserve a second chance! They are actually wonderful sources of vitamin A, folacin, potassium, calcium and fiber. Brussels sprouts are low in fat and high in protein. While they may be an acquired taste for some, others find Brussels Sprouts quite delicious!

Production of Brussels sprouts in the United States began in the 18th century, when French settlers brought them to Louisiana. Most of the United States production is in coastal areas of California, which offer an ideal combination of coastal fog and cool temperatures year-round.Production of Brussels sprouts in the United States began in the 18th century, when French settlers brought them to Louisiana. Most of the United States production is in coastal areas of California, which offer an ideal combination of coastal fog and cool temperatures year-round. 

Recipe of the Week

Creamed Brussel Sprouts 
Recipe Serves 6

Ingredients:
• 2 (1-quart) baskets Brussels sprouts
• Fine sea salt
• 1 tablespoon softened butter
• 1/4 cup heavy whipping cream
• Freshly ground black pepper

Instructions:
1. Bring 4 quarts of water to a boil in a large saucepan; add 2 teaspoons salt and drop in the Brussels sprouts. Cook the sprouts for 5 minutes; drain in a colander and run cold water over them to stop the cooking.
2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
3. Butter a gratin or baking dish and arrange the sprouts heads-up in the dish. Cover with foil and bake 10 minutes.
4. Bring the cream to a boil in a small saucepan. Pour the hot cream over the sprouts and continue baking for 10 more minutes. Season with more salt, if you like, and grind fresh pepper over them before serving.

Fun Facts of the Week

• Brussel sprouts used to be considered a gourmet vegetable in Britain and would be served as a treat with the Christmas dinner.
• Small sprouts have the best flavor.